Tackling Complexity in the Selling System

Simplify the Sales Process

There are a few principles that Orchestrators should fully understand to maximize impact and drive cohesion while blending strategy and execution. All of these challenges, and how to overcome them, are discussed and debated with our podcast listners and in our site. Orchestrators who navigate these waters every day offer this advice to tackling complexiting within the selling system.

  • Get really strong buy-in on the problem first. Just because the problem is clear to you or to your sponsoring executive doesn’t mean it is to other leaders or peers in different organizations. resist the urge to start doing things without first making sure all of the key people really understand the breadth and depth of the problem.
  • The finance department is your friend. After you articulate the full scope of the problem, you will need to produce quick wins. Instead of getting into turf battles when talking about the elimination of programs or budgets, it’s better to have the backing of finance to help you adjudicate the issues that will arise.
  • Be patient. you should resist the urge to try to tackle too much too quickly. There are big differences between finding duplicative work and consolidating related projects. To be successful, you will need to find ways to institutionalize some of the changes made in each phase and build up your support coalition to begin moving to the next one. This is a leadership endeavor, after all.
  • Always think about “what’s next.” Your executive sponsorship will want to know what’s happening but will also want to have a clear view of what you will do next. your focus to most of the organization needs to be about achieving the objectives for your given milestone, and you should be socializing your next phase with your executive leadership at the same time. Like it or not, you are running a change management project in your organization. you need to balance the micro-steps required by most workers to help them avoid confusion against the need to communicate with management about the path you are following.
  • Manage light-bulb moments carefully. Do not underestimate the strength of the muscle memory associated with random acts in your organization. The whole approach of delegating deliverables to individual contributors who feel a sense of ownership over their turf and projects is a huge barrier to overcome. In later stages, shifting the focus from deliverables to services can be even harder. you need to develop a whole strategy built around group working sessions, internal communication programs, and other ways to help the supply chain behind sales see the problem and have “aha” moments. you should invest at least 30% or more of your time in focusing on communicating what you are doing and keeping the buy-in. Without that investment of your time, the inertia of the status quo will drag you and your progress backward to old habits and random acts. you must hold the territory you gain in order to win more.

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